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Search Results
Lucky Market
54 Elm St, Somerville, MA 02144
This corner market offers a large selection of packaged foods, beverages and newspapers. Located just outside of PorterMore Square, the store has been serving Somerville since 1994.
Pick and Go Convenience
349 Highland Ave, Somerville, MA 02144
This neighborhood corner store lives up to its promise of convenience.  You can pick up most of your dailyMore necessities including drinks, snacks, newspapers, and lottery tickets.  There's an ATM on-site, and the store accepts EBT cards.
Big Fish Little Fish
55 Elm St, Somerville, MA 02144
A Somerville fixture since 1971, Big Fish Little Fish has won multiple reader's choice awards from localMore newspapers.  The store is a cozy space with plenty of animals to look at while shopping. It specializes in caged pets, such as fish, birds, lizards and rodents, but also carries products for dogs and cats.
LP Market
96 Highland Ave, Somerville, MA 02143
LP is an independently owned convenience store with all the standard items (lottery/Keno, cigarettes, snacks, soda,More newspapers, etc). In addition, the store has a Slush Puppy machine and serves Richie's Italian Ice. It also has a small selection of prepared sandwiches and an ATM on site.
QRST's
561 Windsor St, Somerville, MA 02143
This shop specializes in custom t-shirt fabrication, but is also known to personalize a hat or bandanna. Inside you'llMore find a hip front office with band posters, neon signs and many framed newspaper articles extolling this business. And behind massive double doors, QRST's shop sprawls into the distance; enormous spinning presses crank out t-shirts, digital printers put photo quality images onto cloth and embroidery machines rapidly stitch logos. Most of its business is handled online, but phone orders and walk-in clients are welcome.
Jr's Deli & Convenience
415 Medford St, Somerville, MA 02145
A 2010 upstart, Jr's Deli is run by a young Somerville local named Roberto, aka "Jr."  He caters exclusively to hisMore local clientele, changing his offerings frequently to reflect the tastes of the community. This full-fledged deli also has a wide selection of packaged snacks, cold drinks, jugs of hot coffee and basic groceries such as eggs, milk and peanut butter. The Buffalo Turkey Sandwich is a crowd favorite. Stacks of newspapers and a prominent Boar's Head sign contribute to the low-key decorum.
Somerville Journal
20 Holland St, Somerville, MA 02144

Founded in 1870, The Somerville Journal is a weekly newspaper serving the city of Somerville.  A printMore edition is published on Thursdays and is available both for purchase in town or via home delivery. An online version, Wicked Local Somerville, is updated on an ongoing basis.

The paper is owned by GateHouse Media Inc., which publishes over 300 papers in 20 states. Print circulation is reported at more than 6,000. Their editorial offices are located next to the Davis Square MBTA station on Holland St. 

Greek American Social Construction Club
79 Bow St, Somerville, MA 02143
Owner Michael Pergantis established this social club in 2010 to allow Greek-Americans (or, as he points out "anyone atMore all!") to come in and have a Greek coffee, watch some European football, or play cards. Lots of seating, a full kitchen, stacks of Greek newspapers and a few TVs can all be found at Mr. Pergantis' club, along with his hearty smile and the promise of a thick cup of coffee.
Sousa's Market
201 Somerville Ave, Somerville, MA 02143
Sousa's Market offers a full line of Portuguese breads, cheeses and linguica sausage, all of which are made in-house.More Customers who step into this shop are surrounded by old world, handmade, fresh products, including seafood, meat, rice, olive oils, spices and baked goods from local vendors. Sousa's also sell lottery tickets and tobacco products. Patrons can enjoy free Portuguese newspapers while they wait for their orders in this pleasant market. 
Winter Hill Bakery
318 Broadway, Somerville, MA 02145
For 35 years, customers have frequented Winter Hill Bakery's tiny shop, devoid of seating or air conditioning, for theMore racks of fresh bread, the glass cases filled with pastries, the mounds of fresh raw dough and -- most of all -- for the heaping bins of Portuguese rolls. Place your order in Portuguese or English, stock up on Brazilian newspapers, admire 75-year-old baking equipment and revel in seriously cheap prices for outstanding pastries.
Dunkin' Donuts
220 Broadway, Somerville, MA 02145
If someone told you they'd never heard of Dunkin' Donuts, you'd probably ask what planet they were from. The 220More Broadway location features everything you'd expect from the world's largest coffee and baked goods chain, including donuts, bagels, sandwiches and, of course, the coffee you crave. Park for free in the lot and pick up some free reading materials from the newspaper boxes out front.
Nabil's Laundromat
211 Pearl St, Somerville, MA 02145
Nabil's Laundromat is clean, well-lit and quiet with several white retro seats and plenty of folding space. With no TVMore or Wi-Fi, Nabil's is basic, but its long row of washers and dryers stretching into the mid-double digits ensure minimal chances of frustratingly full machines. There is a convenience store next door if coffee or newspapers are needed to enliven the washing experience. Nabil's is uniquely open every day, and the last wash is a rather late 8pm.
The Somerville News
699 Broadway, Somerville, MA 02144

The Somerville News is an independent community newspaper serving the city of Somerville. A print edition isMore published weekly on Wednesdays (look for their news boxes throughout the city).  An online version is also available on their website. Print circulation is over 9,500. The paper reported in May 2010 that website hits were averaging 500 per day.  

Beyond reporting on the community, the paper also engages it by hosting comedy and poetry nights as well as an annual writers festival held in November.

In fall 2009, the paper launched Cambridge News Weekly, an online news site for Cambridge, MA, that will eventually also be published in a print edition. The paper reported in June 2010 that it would soon expand into Medford as well.

Cambridge Chronicle
20 Holland St, Somerville, MA 02144

Founded in 1846, The Cambridge Chronicle holds the distinction of being the oldest weekly newspaper in theMore United States that is still publishing. Though its editorial offices are located in Somerville, next to the Davis Square MBTA station on Holland St., the paper serves the city of Cambridge.

A print edition is published weekly on Thursdays and is available both for purchase in town or via home delivery.  Their online version, Wicked Local Cambridge, is updated daily. The paper is owned by GateHouse Media Inc., which publishes over 300 papers in 20 states. Print circulation is approximately 7,500.

 

Somerville Public Library
79 Highland Ave, Somerville, MA 02143

The very first Somerville library opened in 1873 with just 2,389 books on its shelves. Today, the city's threeMore libraries circulate over 440,000 items per year. Books are not all they offer.

All three provide free computer access and WiFi and also loan audiobooks, music CDs and language learning programs as well as films on DVD and video. A large collection of newspapers and magazines can be read at the libraries. Free family passes to area museums can be checked out and used for free admission to venues including the Museum of Science, the New England Aquarium, the Boston Children's Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts.

Activities also fill their calendars. Programs offered include children's story times, book clubs for all ages, film screenings, occasional performances, a young adult chess club and lectures. Community groups may use the main branch's assembly room to hold meetings. All three libraries hold English as Second Language (ESL) classes as well.

How did this all start? In 1907, the wealthy industrialist Andrew Carnegie gave Somerville $123,000 to build the three libraries we still have today: the central Somerville Public Library and the East and West Branches. In 1909, the West Branch opened the doors of its pretty Classical Revival-style building. In 1914, the central library's grand Italian Renaissance Revival-style building, designed by Edward Lippincott Tilton, was complete. And in 1918, the East Branch opened and rounded out the trio.

Somerville Public Library West Branch
40 College Ave, Somerville, MA 02144

The very first Somerville library opened in 1873 with just 2,389 books on its shelves. Today, the city's threeMore libraries circulate over 440,000 items per year. Books are not all they offer.

All three provide free computer access and WiFi and also loan audiobooks, music CDs and language learning programs as well as films on DVD and video. A large collection of newspapers and magazines can be read at the libraries. Free family passes to area museums can be checked out and used for free admission to venues including the Museum of Science, the New England Aquarium, the Boston Children's Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts.

Activities also fill their calendars. Programs offered include children's story times, book clubs for all ages, film screenings, occasional performances, a young adult chess club and lectures. Community groups may use the main branch's assembly room to hold meetings. All three libraries hold English as Second Language (ESL) classes as well.

How did this all start? In 1907, the wealthy industrialist Andrew Carnegie gave Somerville $123,000 to build the three libraries we still have today: the central Somerville Public Library and the East and West Branches. In 1909, the West Branch opened the doors of its pretty Classical Revival-style building. In 1914, the central library's grand Italian Renaissance Revival-style building, designed by Edward Lippincott Tilton, was complete. And in 1918, the East Branch opened and rounded out the trio.

 

Somerville Public Library East Branch
115 Broadway, Somerville, MA 02145

The very first Somerville library opened in 1873 with just 2,389 books on its shelves. Today, the city's threeMore libraries circulate over 440,000 items per year. Books are not all they offer.

All three provide free computer access and WiFi and also loan audiobooks, music CDs and language learning programs as well as films on DVD and video. A large collection of newspapers and magazines can be read at the libraries. Free family passes to area museums can be checked out and used for free admission to venues including the Museum of Science, the New England Aquarium, the Boston Children's Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts.

Activities also fill their calendars. Programs offered include children's story times, book clubs for all ages, film screenings, occasional performances, a young adult chess club and lectures. Community groups may use the main branch's assembly room to hold meetings. All three libraries hold English as Second Language (ESL) classes as well.

How did this all start? In 1907, the wealthy industrialist Andrew Carnegie gave Somerville $123,000 to build the three libraries we still have today: the central Somerville Public Library and the East and West Branches. In 1909, the West Branch opened the doors of its pretty Classical Revival-style building. In 1914, the central library's grand Italian Renaissance Revival-style building, designed by Edward Lippincott Tilton, was complete. And in 1918, the East Branch opened and rounded out the trio.