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Friends of the Somerville Library
79 Highland Ave, Somerville, MA 02143
The Friends of the Somerville Library is a non-profit community organization that works to expand the resourcesMore available to the library system. The Friends of the Somerville Library sponsor programs including musical performances and author readings and host a book sale twice a year. Funds raised by the Friends also provide the library with resources and services beyond the library's allotted budget. Annual meetings organized by the board allow members to meet with the Library Director to discuss needs and goals, to monitor funds and to elect officers. 
Somerville Public Library
79 Highland Ave, Somerville, MA 02143

The very first Somerville library opened in 1873 with just 2,389 books on its shelves. Today, the city's threeMore libraries circulate over 440,000 items per year. Books are not all they offer.

All three provide free computer access and WiFi and also loan audiobooks, music CDs and language learning programs as well as films on DVD and video. A large collection of newspapers and magazines can be read at the libraries. Free family passes to area museums can be checked out and used for free admission to venues including the Museum of Science, the New England Aquarium, the Boston Children's Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts.

Activities also fill their calendars. Programs offered include children's story times, book clubs for all ages, film screenings, occasional performances, a young adult chess club and lectures. Community groups may use the main branch's assembly room to hold meetings. All three libraries hold English as Second Language (ESL) classes as well.

How did this all start? In 1907, the wealthy industrialist Andrew Carnegie gave Somerville $123,000 to build the three libraries we still have today: the central Somerville Public Library and the East and West Branches. In 1909, the West Branch opened the doors of its pretty Classical Revival-style building. In 1914, the central library's grand Italian Renaissance Revival-style building, designed by Edward Lippincott Tilton, was complete. And in 1918, the East Branch opened and rounded out the trio.

Somerville Public Library West Branch
40 College Ave, Somerville, MA 02144

The very first Somerville library opened in 1873 with just 2,389 books on its shelves. Today, the city's threeMore libraries circulate over 440,000 items per year. Books are not all they offer.

All three provide free computer access and WiFi and also loan audiobooks, music CDs and language learning programs as well as films on DVD and video. A large collection of newspapers and magazines can be read at the libraries. Free family passes to area museums can be checked out and used for free admission to venues including the Museum of Science, the New England Aquarium, the Boston Children's Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts.

Activities also fill their calendars. Programs offered include children's story times, book clubs for all ages, film screenings, occasional performances, a young adult chess club and lectures. Community groups may use the main branch's assembly room to hold meetings. All three libraries hold English as Second Language (ESL) classes as well.

How did this all start? In 1907, the wealthy industrialist Andrew Carnegie gave Somerville $123,000 to build the three libraries we still have today: the central Somerville Public Library and the East and West Branches. In 1909, the West Branch opened the doors of its pretty Classical Revival-style building. In 1914, the central library's grand Italian Renaissance Revival-style building, designed by Edward Lippincott Tilton, was complete. And in 1918, the East Branch opened and rounded out the trio.

 

Somerville Public Library East Branch
115 Broadway, Somerville, MA 02145

The very first Somerville library opened in 1873 with just 2,389 books on its shelves. Today, the city's threeMore libraries circulate over 440,000 items per year. Books are not all they offer.

All three provide free computer access and WiFi and also loan audiobooks, music CDs and language learning programs as well as films on DVD and video. A large collection of newspapers and magazines can be read at the libraries. Free family passes to area museums can be checked out and used for free admission to venues including the Museum of Science, the New England Aquarium, the Boston Children's Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts.

Activities also fill their calendars. Programs offered include children's story times, book clubs for all ages, film screenings, occasional performances, a young adult chess club and lectures. Community groups may use the main branch's assembly room to hold meetings. All three libraries hold English as Second Language (ESL) classes as well.

How did this all start? In 1907, the wealthy industrialist Andrew Carnegie gave Somerville $123,000 to build the three libraries we still have today: the central Somerville Public Library and the East and West Branches. In 1909, the West Branch opened the doors of its pretty Classical Revival-style building. In 1914, the central library's grand Italian Renaissance Revival-style building, designed by Edward Lippincott Tilton, was complete. And in 1918, the East Branch opened and rounded out the trio.

Johnson Roberts Associates
15 Rev Nazareno Properzi Way, Somerville, MA 02143
Johnson Roberts Associates is an architectural firm. The firm helps clients through initial design and intoMore master planning and construction. The company's portfolio includes public libraries, town offices, public safety facilities, court houses, college and university facilities, churches and historic preservations.
Bent Electrical Contractors
59 Innerbelt Rd, Somerville, MA 02143
Bent Electrical Contractors designs and installs power, lighting, fire alarm and security systems for a variety ofMore commercial and residential costumers. Clients have included universities, laboratories, museums, libraries and churches. The company is a member of the Associated General Contractors of Massachusetts, National Electrical Contractors Association and the National Fire Protection Association.
Burton F. Faulkner Towers
25 Highland Ave, Somerville, MA 02143
Burton F. Faulkner Towers is a subsidized modern housing complex for elderly residents. Many of the units have terracesMore and there's a shaded outdoor common area at street level with numerous benches. The building is well maintained and centrally located right beside the Somerville Library bus stop. You must call the office to request an application.
Pave-Lok Engraving
86 Joy St, Somerville, MA 02143
Pave-Lok Engraving is a brick engraving service located in Somerville, Massahusetts. The company engraves bricks forMore libraries, churches, universities, parks and museums. Pave-Lok Engraving provides a variety of of brick and lettering styles, a six-inch brick with two lines being the standard. 
Studio TKM
1 Fitchburg St, Somerville, MA 02143
Working out of a large workspace in the Brick Bottom Artists Building in Somerville, Studio TKM offers services inMore preserving works on paper for companies that do not have the capabilities themselves, such as libraries, archives, historical societies and museums. Maps, historical documents, fine art and architectural plans are just some of the works the studio has serviced.
Central Hill Park
81 Highland Ave, Somerville, MA 02143

With all the buildings that sit beside it, it's easy to overlook Central Hill Park. But this stretch of land onMore Highland Ave. that runs from the library, past the high school and on to City Hall is not just any green space. Laid out in 1876, Central Hill Park is one the city's two oldest parks (Foss Park was dedicated the same year). Walk its few shaded pathways and you can almost imagine our Victorian forebears strolling along on a Sunday with their top hats and parasols.

Today, it covers over 8 acres including the shaded plaza in front of the library, a playground next door and several grassy expanses. A number of memorials also stand on the grounds: the Civil War Memorial to the Union, the Korean War Memorial, the Vietnam Memorial, the George Dilboy Memorial, the America Legion Memorial, The Somerville Honor Role memorial to WWII veterans, the Philippine Insurrection and China Relief Memorial, and The Unitarian Church Memorial.