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XL Hybrids
1 Concord Ave, Somerville, MA 02143
XL Hybrids is a green engineering company that converts commercial fleets to hybrids. This hybrid conversion not onlyMore helps these commercial vehicles "go green," but it also allows the fleets to save money on fuel. To learn more, visit the Web site or call the number provided.
Osgood Community Garden
6 Osgood St, Somerville, MA 02143

The city's nine community gardens mean Somervillians who long to garden don't have to go without homegrown tomatoesMore and other garden delights–even if most of us have postage-stamp-sized yards (or perhaps just a stoop). Volunteer garden coordinators manage each garden. They assign personal garden plots to interested green thumbs and organize bulk compost purchases. Gardeners pay a small fee (usually under $25 per year) and then can plant whatever they like in their plot be it flowers, herbs or vegetables.

All gardeners share upkeep of the garden pathways and compost bins, but plots are private: if you grow it, only you (and the occasional raccoon) pick it.

Every city resident is eligible for a plot, but wait lists can be lengthy. The gardens are managed by the city's Conservation Commission and overseen by a citywide garden coordinator. To sign up for any garden, contact the coordinator at the number above. If you have land available for a new garden, talk to the coordinator as well.

Walnut Street Community Garden
19 Walnut St, Somerville, MA 02143

The city's nine community gardens mean Somervillians who long to garden don't have to go without homegrown tomatoesMore and other garden delights–even if most of us have postage-stamp-sized yards (or perhaps just a stoop). Volunteer garden coordinators manage each garden. They assign personal garden plots to interested green thumbs and organize bulk compost purchases. Gardeners pay a small fee (usually under $25 per year) and then can plant whatever they like in their plot be it flowers, herbs or vegetables.

All gardeners share upkeep of the garden pathways and compost bins, but plots are private: if you grow it, only you (and the occasional raccoon) pick it.

Every city resident is eligible for a plot, but wait lists can be lengthy. The gardens are managed by the city's Conservation Commission and overseen by a citywide garden coordinator. To sign up for any garden, contact the coordinator at the number above. If you have land available for a new garden, talk to the coordinator as well.

Bikeway Community Garden
Winslow Ave & Clifton St, Somerville, MA 02144

The city's nine community gardens mean Somervillians who long to garden don't have to go without homegrown tomatoesMore and other garden delights–even if most of us have postage-stamp-sized yards (or perhaps just a stoop). Volunteer garden coordinators manage each garden. They assign personal garden plots to interested green thumbs and organize bulk compost purchases. Gardeners pay a small fee (usually under $25 per year) and then can plant whatever they like in their plot be it flowers, herbs or vegetables.

All gardeners share upkeep of the garden pathways and compost bins, but plots are private: if you grow it, only you (and the occasional raccoon) pick it.

Every city resident is eligible for a plot, but wait lists can be lengthy. The gardens are managed by the city's Conservation Commission and overseen by a citywide garden coordinator. To sign up for any garden, contact the coordinator at the number above. If you have land available for a new garden, talk to the coordinator as well.

 

 

Glen Community Garden
Glen St & Oliver St, Somerville, MA 02145

The city's nine community gardens mean Somervillians who long to garden don't have to go without homegrown tomatoesMore and other garden delights–even if most of us have postage-stamp-sized yards (or perhaps just a stoop). Volunteer garden coordinators manage each garden. They assign personal garden plots to interested green thumbs and organize bulk compost purchases. Gardeners pay a small fee (usually under $25 per year) and then can plant whatever they like in their plot be it flowers, herbs or vegetables.

All gardeners share upkeep of the garden pathways and compost bins, but plots are private: if you grow it, only you (and the occasional raccoon) pick it.

Every city resident is eligible for a plot, but wait lists can be lengthy. The gardens are managed by the city's Conservation Commission and overseen by a citywide garden coordinator. To sign up for any garden, contact the coordinator at the number above. If you have land to offer for a new garden, talk to the coordinator as well.

Allen Street Community Garden
29 Allen St, Somerville, MA 02143

The city's nine community gardens mean Somervillians who long to garden don't have to go without homegrown tomatoesMore and other garden delights–even if most of us have postage-stamp-sized yards (or perhaps just a stoop). Volunteer garden coordinators manage each garden. They assign personal garden plots to interested green thumbs and organize bulk compost purchases. Gardeners pay a small fee (usually under $25 per year) and then can plant whatever they like in their plot be it flowers, herbs or vegetables.

All gardeners share upkeep of the garden pathways and compost bins, but plots are private: if you grow it, only you (and the occasional raccoon) pick it.

Every city resident is eligible for a plot, but wait lists can be lengthy. The gardens are managed by the city's Conservation Commission and overseen by a citywide garden coordinator. To sign up for any garden, contact the coordinator at the number above. Individuals and businesses with land available for a new garden should contact the coordinator as well.

Durell Community Garden
245 Beacon St, Somerville, MA 02143

The city's nine community gardens mean Somervillians who long to garden don't have to go without homegrown tomatoesMore and other garden delights–even if most of us have postage-stamp-sized yards (or perhaps just a stoop). Volunteer garden coordinators manage each garden. They assign personal garden plots to interested green thumbs and organize bulk compost purchases. Gardeners pay a small fee (usually under $25 per year) and then can plant whatever they like in their plot be it flowers, herbs or vegetables.

All gardeners share upkeep of the garden pathways and compost bins, but plots are private: if you grow it, only you (and the occasional raccoon) pick it.

Every city resident is eligible for a plot, but wait lists can be lengthy. The gardens are managed by the city's Conservation Commission and overseen by a citywide garden coordinator. To sign up for any garden, contact the coordinator at the number above. If you have land available for use as a new garden, talk to the coordinator as well.

 

Avon Community Garden
44 Avon St, Somerville, MA 02143

The city's nine community gardens mean Somervillians who long to garden don't have to go without homegrown tomatoesMore and other garden delights–even if most of us have postage-stamp-sized yards (or perhaps just a stoop). Volunteer garden coordinators manage each garden. They assign personal garden plots to interested green thumbs and organize bulk compost purchases. Gardeners pay a small fee (usually under $25 per year) and then can plant whatever they like in their plot be it flowers, herbs or vegetables.

All gardeners share upkeep of the garden pathways and compost bins, but plots are private: if you grow it, only you (and the occasional raccoon) pick it.

Every city resident is eligible for a plot, but wait lists can be lengthy. The gardens are managed by the city's Conservation Commission and overseen by a citywide garden coordinator. To sign up for any garden, contact the coordinator at the number above. If you have land available for a new garden, talk to the coordinator as well.

Albion Community Garden
108 Albion St, Somerville, MA 02144

The city's nine community gardens mean Somervillians who long to garden don't have to go without homegrown tomatoesMore and other garden delights–even if most of us have postage-stamp-sized yards (or perhaps just a stoop). Volunteer garden coordinators manage each garden. They assign personal garden plots to interested green thumbs and organize bulk compost purchases. Gardeners pay a small fee (usually under $25 per year) and then can plant whatever they like in their plot be it flowers, herbs or vegetables.

All gardeners share upkeep of the garden pathways and compost bins, but plots are private: if you grow it, only you (and the occasional raccoon) pick it.

Every city resident is eligible for a plot, but wait lists can be lengthy. The gardens are managed by the city's Conservation Commission and overseen by a citywide garden coordinator. To sign up for any garden, contact the coordinator at the number above. If you have land to offer for a new garden, talk to the coordinator as well.

Prospect Hill Park
Munroe St & Prospect Hill Ave, Somerville, MA 02143

George Washington didn't just sleep here. During the Revolutionary War, our future first president ordered the firstMore raising of the American flag right atop this very hill. On January 1, 1776, the "Grand Union Flag" (as it was then called) was raised on a ship's mast standing tall on Prospect Hill. Some 4,000 Continental Army troops encamped on the hill celebrated with a gun salute and cheering. As those troops then fought during the siege of Boston, historians say the sight of the flag kept them going. And by March, they drove the British out.

Today, a replica of the flag still flies atop Prospect Hill Tower, which was built along with the park in 1903. You'll notice the flag is not the familiar Stars & Stripes. To better represent the new colonies, the first flag's British crosses were replaced with 13 stars in 1777. So consider the park your chance to see the American flag version 1.0.

You can also relax and take in sweeping views of Boston here. Climb the steps to the tower and the Boston skyline is yours. A stately park with shade trees, green lawns and benches surrounds the tower. Picnickers, sunbathers and dog owners enjoy the grounds. Residents gather each year on January 1 to commemorate the raising of first flag.

 

Tufts Community Garden
80 Powder House Blvd, Somerville, MA 02144

The city's nine community gardens mean Somervillians who long to garden don't have to go without homegrownMore tomatoes and other garden delights–even if most of us have postage-stamp-sized yards (or perhaps just a stoop). Volunteer garden coordinators manage each garden. They assign personal garden plots to interested green thumbs and organize bulk compost purchases. Gardeners pay a small fee (usually under $25 per year) and then can plant whatever they like in their plot be it flowers, herbs or vegetables.

Gardeners can thank Tuft's University for this garden location. The university generously provides the land and water as part of their community outreach.

All gardeners share upkeep of the garden pathways and compost bins, but plots are private: if you grow it, only you (and the occasional raccoon) pick it.

Every city resident is eligible for a plot, but wait lists can be lengthy. The gardens are managed by the city's Conservation Commission and overseen by a citywide garden coordinator. To sign up for any garden, contact the coordinator at the number above. If you have land available for a new garden, talk to the coordinator as well.

 

 

 

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